Tag Archives for " porsche "

Wonderful short video of a Porsche 911 Targa by TechBen

I just stumbled across this video by a German youtuber called Techben: I love his videography style and (obviously) his awesome Porsche 911E Targa.

“In meinem heutigen CINEMATIC-VIDEO zum Porsche 911E Targa, zeige ich was mit der Sony a6300 (Kit-Objektiv) in Kombination mit der Inspire 1, GoPro Hero 4 und Edelkrone Slider so möglich ist.”

which means

In my current CINEMATIC-VIDEO to the Porsche 911E Targa, I show what is possible with the Sony a6300 (kit lens) in combination with the Inspire 1, GoPro Hero 4 and Edelkrone slider.”


How to Fix the Porsche Cayenne Drive Shaft Clamp Bearing Support Mount

Is there a midget with a hammer hiding inside your Porsche Cayenne (or VW Tourag) gearbox? Does light acceleration make your car twitter like a flock of angry birds? Chances are it’s the Porsche Cayenne Drive Shaft support failing – This part is basically a rubber support that is in the middle of the driveshaft. This is a well known piece that wears out on Porsche Cayenne (and VW Tourags) at around 100k miles. Porsche Cayenne Drive ShaftOn mine it suddenly wore out quite spectacularly, while pulling away reasonably hard into traffic there was a loud *BANG* and then *KNOCK KNOCK KNOCK KNOCK* which sounded like it was coming from inside the gear box housing, or where the gear change lever is.

I was quoted $2000+ to fix this from a local Porsche Dealer so decided to do it myself. I’m a noob mechanic and this is the first mechanical thing I have ever undertaken with this car.

This “Porsche Cayenne Drive Shaft” fix was a simple procedure (even for a mechanically inept buffoon such as myself) and took me about 40 minutes, and that is including reading instructions, trying to records this nonsense and (obviously) spending many minutes trying to squeeze my fat belly under the car….

I don’t work for Vertex nor do I have any interest – but it fixed the problem and was easy for a fat fingered mechanically inept gray haired old fart like me to install!

You can buy the part from VERTEX and will need to buy some ramps (about $40) and an angle grinder (also about $40-50) and then a few basic tools (couple of spanners, some wire snips and a razor blade to trim the old rubber off the center support on the drive shaft).

#just-do-it

 

Driving Porsches around the Austrian (Österreich) Curves

I just stumbled across this wonderful video on YouTube, a bunch of guys driving various Porsche 911 models around the beautiful curvy Austrian roads. With a only 35 views and only 2 likes? This video needs some adverting, it’s wonderful!

I know nothing about the YouTube channel Unique 911 Driving but I’m subscribed and hoping for new videos soon. Described as “…a group of Porsche 911 enthusiasts, who love this car and spend quality time together to get out and drive. Here we share some of our experiences.” 

I’m looking forward to the next 911 adventure.  🙂

Changing the battery in a Porsche Cayenne S

Its hidden under the seat

Miss Kates battery decided to was time to go sleep. #thebigsleep It had fizzled and farted for a couple of months and because she had let it run completely flat a few times, it finally gave up the ghost. So it wont start but has just enough juice to operate the internal electrics and to get it jump started and driven to my place…

The battery in a Porsche Cayenne is cunningly hidden away under the drivers seat – in the traditional place in the front engine compartment there is a + and = terminal that can be used to jump start the vehicle.

I had never changed a Cayenne battery before but decided to video the process after reading the steps on a Forum. It was easy, a little fiddly and took around 15-20 minutes. Now I’ve done it once it would take half that when/if I do it again.

How to replace porsche cayenne battery

Tools: M10 multispline 3/8 socket & ratchet 10mm 3/8 socket 10mm spanner Most Porsche Cayenne 955 (Gen 1) models have a single large battery under the left front seat: that is the passenger seat on a right-hand drive car. The seat base lifts up on a pair of rear-mounted hinges to allow access to the battery box. The multispline M10 bolts which hold the front of the seat frame down are under the two plastic covers in front of the seat: these just clip off to reveal the bolt heads. Undo the bolts and tilt the seat up: hold it up out of the way with a strap to the grab handle if you’re worried. Now you can see the battery cover, which has four clips, one in each corner: undo those and lift the cover off. Your 10mm spanner will undo the terminals (remove earth first), and the 10mm socket will undo the front corner bracket, and the big side clamp holding the battery in place. If you’re worried about losing your radio settings etc, connect a battery charger to the terminals before you unhook them. Once the two clamps are off and the terminals have been detached and secured out of the way, disconnect the small battery vent hose and get the old battery out of there. It is worth cleaning any dirt and dust out of the battery tray before sliding the new battery in.

Ferdinand Magazine